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Pacific Oaks Anti-Bias Education Symposium

 

ROOTED in Criminal Justice Reform: Transforming Reentry

 

Presented by Pacific Oaks College School of Cultural & Family Psychology:
Bachelor of Social Work & Community Psychology programs

For 75 years, Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School has been a pioneer in creating culturally-responsive agents of change through the values of social justice, diversity, respect, and inclusion. As we continue to be an advocate in driving change in our communities, please join us for Part 4 of our Anti-Bias Education Series on Friday, September 17, 2021, 2:00-5:00 p.m. PDT.

REGISTER TODAY!

 

Please join us for a discussion on the importance of transforming the current criminal justice system to create an equitable and successful transition from incarceration to rejoining the community. Learn about strategies to support justice-involved individuals.

FEATURED SPEAKERS:

Joe Paul sqJoseph “Joe” Paul

Joseph “Joe” Paul is a seasoned reentry professional with over 27 years of community service working with ex-offenders, high-risk adults, and various community development and faith-based organizations. Currently, Joseph serves as the managing director for the Los Angeles Regional Reentry Partnership (LARRP). Prior to joining LARRP, Joseph served as the administrator of vocational and workforce development services for SHIELDS for Families, overseeing multiple government-funded reentry programs for the agency.

Joseph previously contributed to the development of the highly successful Back on Track Program, which is a Los Angeles County Reentry Collaboration launched by then California Attorney General Kamala Harris out of her DR3 office to address recidivism in our state. As the program coordinator of New Start LA Reentry Programs, Joseph was a key figure in the success of the City of LA. Workforce Development Collaborative, which provided employment preparation, mental health services, and related resources to those seeking employment upon parole from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Tiffany JohnsonTiffany Johnson

Tiffany Johnson is a Black Woman who survived horrible traumatic life abuses which ultimately lead to 16 years of incarceration that affected her family, her community, and society, and wonders how this happened. Tiffany walked the grounds of two of the largest prisons in California, Valley State Prison (VSP) and Central California Women’s Facility (CCWF), while serving a 15 year to life sentence. On April 28, 2010, she walked through the prison gates to start her new life. Through guidance and connections, she went on to claim a career through advocacy and organizing. She learned how to use the very traumas that she fought to survive and is committed being the voice of change to help create change by way of life experiences.

As a non-traditional subject matter expert on the effect of trauma, Tiffany seeks to provide a platform focusing on supporting people through life traumatic experiences and guiding them to freedom! Tiffany has completed numerous presentations throughout the country and offers a unique perspective on the intricacies of overcoming reentry and trauma barriers after years of incarceration.

PRESENTED BY:

  • Dr. Mary Starks, Ph.D., Program Director of the Bachelor of Social Work program and Administrative Faculty for the School of Cultural & Family Psychology
  • Sheree Bielecki, M.Ed., Lead Faculty for the Bachelor of Community Psychology program and Core Faculty for the School of Cultural & Family Psychology
  • Dr. Ja N’et Rommero, Psy.D., Administrative Faculty, Academic Affairs

 

More about the inspiration behind the Anti-Bias Education Series:

*In 1989, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) published Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children, by Louise Derman-Sparks (Faculty Emeritus) and the Anti-Bias Curriculum Task Force (Pacific Oaks Children’s School teachers and Pacific Oaks College alumni). The first of its kind, Professor Sparks’ work changed the landscape of early childhood education—introducing curriculum that empowers children and promotes critical thinking about bias.

For 75 years, Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School has been a pioneer in creating culturally responsive agents of change through the core values of social justice, diversity, respect, and inclusion.

As we continue to be an advocate in driving change in our communities, Pacific Oaks, in partnership with The Parent Venture, held Part III of our FREE Anti-Bias Education Series, “A Path to Opportunity Through Education and Activism,” with edu-activist and author Dr. César A. Cruz as the featured speaker.

Dr. Cruz facilitated a conversation that analyzed the road to opportunity through education and activism. He touched upon his own immigrant story, from his journey from Mexico to South L.A. with his mother and grandmother, to the deportation of his mother, to finding his way through his struggles and success in education. The presentation unpacked the concepts of subtractive schooling, stereotype threat, impostor syndrome, racial battle fatigue, epigenetics and intertwined them with intergenerational wisdom, movement building, mutual aid societies, and community cultural wealth on the road towards educational justice.

View Session Recording

 

About the Speaker: Dr. César A. Cruz

Cesar Cruz

The United States has always been a nation of immigrants, a land of opportunity for newcomers. In order to develop pathways to success, it is imperative that we help immigrants and first-generation children and families gain access to and succeed in higher education. Please join us as we hear from and honor the immigrant story of Dr. César A. Cruz.

A veteran educator, Dr. Cruz will facilitate a conversation that analyzes the road to opportunity through education and activism. We will unpack the concepts of subtractive schooling, stereotype threat, impostor syndrome, racial battle fatigue, and epigenetics and intertwine them with intergenerational wisdom, movement building, mutual aid societies, and community cultural wealth on the road toward educational justice.

Dr. Cruz has dedicated his life to fighting for justice from marching 76 straight miles to hunger striking for 26 days. He was born in Guadalajara, México, and migrated to the U.S. at age 9 with his mother and grandmother. He grew up in South Central LA and moved to the Bay Area to study. Dr. Cruz earned a B.A. in history from U.C. Berkeley, and received his doctorate in educational leadership from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, becoming the first Mexican immigrant male to do so.

Dr. Cruz currently oversees the Homies Empowerment Program, a community empowerment program serving gang-involved youth in Oakland, California. He is an edu-activist and the author of two books, “Revenge of the Illegal Alien” and “Bang for Freedom.”

About our Partner, The Parent Venture

Parent Venture

Located in Menlo Park, California, The Parent Venture is a nonprofit organization that provides professional, high-quality parent and community education that supports the mental, physical, and social-emotional health and well-being of children and teens.

More about the inspiration behind the Anti-Bias Education Series

In 1989, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) published "Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children" by Louise Derman-Sparks (faculty emeritus) and the Anti-Bias Curriculum Task Force (Pacific Oaks Children’s School teachers and Pacific Oaks College alumni). The first of its kind, Sparks’ work changed the landscape of early childhood education—introducing curriculum that empowers children and promotes critical thinking about bias.

For 75 years, Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School has been a pioneer in creating culturally responsive agents of change through the core values of social justice, diversity, respect, and inclusion.

As we continue to be an advocate in driving change in our communities, Pacific Oaks held Part II of our Anti-Bias Education Series, "A Multi-Generational Perspective," on Friday, November 20, 2020.

This event included two special sessions focusing on multi-generational perspectives and were designed for anyone interested in anti-bias and anti-racist education and resources.

Resource Guide for both sessions

SESSION 1: Kidposium

View Session Recording

What does it look like for children and families to be advocates and change agents? What are young people’s thoughts and feelings about racial issues, and how can we have these conversations? We hear from children and their parents on these issues, learn what resources are available for support, and discuss how to encourage families to use their voices and become activists and advocates.

PANEL:

  • Carlene Fider, Ph.D.,Core Faculty, Pacific Oaks College School of Human Development (Moderator)
  • Esteban (age 12), Mikhal (age 6), and their mom Karina
  • Elle (age 12), and her mom Jill

SESSION 2: The Grandparents’ Roundtable

View Session Recording

Our families provide a strong link to our heritage as well as influence how we process the wide variety of information around us. With their knowledge that prejudicial behavior and how to treat “different” people are learned, grandparents share their experiences and intergenerational messages on effective tools for teaching respect, tolerance for differences, and coping with adverse situations. During this special session, grandparents also share what information they believe is important to pass down through the family. 

PANEL:

  • Judy Krause, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Education, Pacific Oaks College School of Education (Moderator)
  • Yolanda Carlos, Ed. D., Core Faculty, Pacific Oaks College School of Education
  • Terry Webster, Ph. D, Dean, Pacific Oaks College School of Human Development
  • Aaron Jenkins
  • Miguel Martinez

More about the inspiration behind the Anti-Bias Education Series

In 1989, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) published Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children, by Louise Derman-Sparks (Faculty Emeritus) and the Anti-Bias Curriculum Task Force (Pacific Oaks Children’s School teachers and Pacific Oaks College alumni). The first of its kind, Professor Sparks’ work changed the landscape of early childhood education—introducing curriculum that empowers children and promotes critical thinking about bias.

“Differences do not create bias. Children learn prejudice from prejudice—not from learning about human diversity.”

In keeping with its longstanding commitment to community, equality, and peace, Pacific Oaks hosted a free virtual conference, Anti-Bias Education Symposium: Fighting Against Racism, on July 23, 2020.

Designed for professionals in early childhood education and the K-12 system, parents, nonprofit leaders, and members of the public interested in working to end systemic racism, the event brought together more than 1100 people who participated in the four different webinars. Each webinar had powerful discussions, vital resources, and necessary information.

The conference began with a general session led by Dr. Donald E. Grant Jr., Executive Director, Pacific Oaks Center for Community & Social Impact, then had participants choose breakout sessions highlighting anti-bias programming either in early childhood education, K-12, or for parents.

For 75 years, Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School has embodied the values of social justice, diversity, respect, and inclusion. In 1989, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) published Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children by Louise Derman-Sparks (faculty emeritus) and the Anti-Bias Curriculum Task Force (Pacific Oaks Children’s School teachers and Pacific Oaks College alumni). The first of its kind, Professor Sparks’ work changed the landscape of early childhood education—introducing curriculum that empowers children and promotes critical thinking about bias.

In an effort to further disseminate this crucial information, Pacific Oaks is proud to offer video recordings of the webinars along with the presentations. In addition, the Pacific Oaks Library has developed an Anti-Bias Resource Guide with links to websites, publications, videos, and other resources. Please note that some resources are only available to students at Pacific Oaks College.

Opening Session:

“Anti-Bias Programming: Using History as a Foundation for Change,” presented by Donald E. Grant Jr., Psy.D., Executive Director, Pacific Oaks Center for Community & Social Impact.
Presentation PDF
Presentation recording
Resource Guide

Breakout Sessions:

Early Childhood Education: “Anti-Bias Education: Connections, Respect, and Inclusiveness in the Early Childhood Classroom, presented by Judy Krause, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Education, Pacific Oaks College School of Education.
Presentation PDF
Presentation recording

K-12 Education: “Difficult Dialogues: Anti-Biased Education,” presented by Jerell B. Hill, Ed.D., Interim Dean, Pacific Oaks College School of Education.
Presentation PDF
Presentation recording 

Parents: “Raising Inclusive Children: A Guide for Parents,” presented by Ted Hamory, M.A. Ed., MBA, Head of School, and Tanynya Hekymara, B.A., Director of Admissions and Civic Engagement, The Oaks School.
Presentation PDF
Presentation recording

Speaker Bios

Donald E. Grant Jr., Psy.D., Executive Director, Pacific Oaks Center for Community & Social Impact

Dr. Grant serves as Executive Director of the Center for Community and Social Impact (CCSI) at Pacific Oaks College in Pasadena, California, and has a long history of direct mental health service delivery and administrative oversight for foster care systems, child welfare programs, education systems, and homeless mental wellness services. Dr. Grant works diligently to increase awareness on mental wellness issues, parenting, child development, and sociocultural events that impact citizens of our country and our world. His latest publication, Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations is available now.

Judy Krause, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Education, Pacific Oaks College School of Education

Dr. Judy Krause serves as director of Early Childhood Education (ECE) in the School of Education at Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School. Judy chairs the bachelor’s and master’s ECE programs at the college and has been working with young children and their families since 1978. She began her work with college students in 1989. Dr. Krause’s research focuses on developmentally and culturally appropriate pedagogy, and she enjoys presenting hands-on, interactive workshops at the national, state, and local level. In her spare time, she takes joy in traveling along the coast with her husband, as well as spending time with her grandchildren.

Jerell B. Hill, Ed.D., Interim Dean, Pacific Oaks College School of Education

Dr. Jerell Hill is the Interim Dean for the School of Education (SOE) at Pacific Oaks College. He previously served as an Administrative Faculty and Assessment Coordinator for the SOE and as faculty adviser for Multiple Subject Credential candidates. His responsibilities include program development, supporting adjunct faculty, accreditation, and student teaching. Dr. Hill’s areas of research interest include adverse childhood experience, student motivation, educational administration, special education, and urban schools. His professional memberships include the American Educational Research Association, California Association of African-American Superintendents and Administrators, International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (co-chair of the Diversity and Cultural Competence Committee), and the Council for Exceptional Children. Dr. Hill has been a Keynote Speaker and presenter at the International Congress of Educators in Lima, Peru.

Ted Hamory, M.A. Ed., MBA, Head of School, The Oaks School

Ted Hamory is the Head of School at The Oaks School. Ted’s career in education began more than 25 years ago as a bilingual teacher with Teach for America. Within a decade, he had co-founded a small bilingual charter school in downtown Long Beach, California. This school, which opened in 2000 with 70 students, brought progressive, public education to an underserved, ethnically diverse community. He then led the expansion of the school to three campuses, serving grades K-12, with 700 students. In 2010, Ted became the fourth Head of The Oaks School, a progressive K-6 school in Hollywood, where he is thrilled to help build on the school’s solid reputation for creating thoughtful, compassionate students who love to learn. Ted earned an MBA from the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, an M.A. in Education from Pepperdine University, and a B.A. from Vanderbilt University, where he studied Economics and Spanish. Ted enjoys spending time with his six children, reading, and working in his garden.

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